Australianisms & Regional Slang

Australianisms & Regional Slang
#51
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
I'm pretty sure they are, yeah.
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#52
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
(11-18-2015, 03:33 AM)SleepingOrange Wrote: »I feel pretty confident only one of those is regional

It's hard to tell... Melonspa
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#53
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
Entry 4: Chuck a Sickie

To call in sick to work.

This one, strangely enough, gets thrown around a lot on Melbourne Cup day. It's a summer day in November where people race racehorses on a racetrack for racehorses, and we get inordinately obsessed with who wins and who poisoned whose horse and no one, absolutely no one, does any actual work on the day, opting instead to participate in the most Australian activity possible (aside from animal cruelty): getting fucking hammered.

Example: "You gonna chuck a sickie for the Melbourne Cup, love? Work won't need us that much!"
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#54
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
Cup day is a hell of an event here, too. I live just down the road from the actual racing track. Shit gets messy
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#55
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
And welcome back to my sadly neglected Australianisms thread, mainly because I was apart from my resident Australian for a while there ;-; Today we have a TRIPLE FUCKING THREAT ENTRY! Mainly because this entry is, like, super fucking sweary.

Entry 5: Fuck That For A Joke

Fuuuuuuuuck thaaaaaaaat.

I'll do that the day I willingly walk into dropbear territory. I'll do that the day it snows in the outback. I'll do that the day... look, seriously mate, this is fucking stupid.

"You want me to swim with the crocs for a holiday snap? Fuck that for a joke."

Entry 6: Fuck Yas, And Fuck The Lot Of Yas

Fuuuuuuuck youuuuuuu.

Often delivered with a sardonic 'fark' sound in place of the 'fuck'. So incredibly Australian that it actually has its own sign-language short translation.

"Well, foreman just let me go without severance pay - I'll be going to Fair Work about this. Fuck yas, and fuck the lot of yas."

Entry 7: Mad As A Cut Snake

Maaaaad aaaaas aaaa...

To be very mad. In both senses.

In an incredible use of economy, both ideas of being incredibly angry and excessively crazy are rolled into one delightful package here.

"You'd best not be around when Mad Mick Bludger comes running by mate, someone egged his car and he's madder than a cut snake!"
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#56
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
mat​e
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#57
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
(02-14-2016, 02:38 PM)bigro Wrote: »mat​e

m8
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#58
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
[Image: fll9XIL.gif]
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#59
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
cutsnake is the new class that you can choose when you're born. unfortunately, you won't be very cognizant of this option because you will, at that time, be a snake.
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#60
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
(02-14-2016, 05:16 PM)Lankie Wrote: »
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good.

e: wait this isnt' hawkspace so I added a word to make it not an emptyquote
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#61
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
(02-14-2016, 03:20 PM)AgentBlue Wrote: »
(02-14-2016, 02:38 PM)bigro Wrote: »mat​e

m8
Mate....
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#62
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
(02-14-2016, 05:16 PM)Lankie Wrote: »
[Image: fll9XIL.gif]

Eli salutes.
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#63
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
Entry 8: Plum

adj. straight, on target, perfect

Derived from cricket. A 'plum throw' is one that goes right down the center and hits the middle wicket and blobbly dongler which means it's two points not out plus runs with the squiff, which is added to the total double-half major score of the 24-hour test...

"You slotted the fuel rod on your first try? That's dead plum, that is."
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#64
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
So I was at the bottl-o for a cheeky bev in the arvo before goin to me friend's 21st (she's a great cunt, wouldn't miss it). Bought a slab of ginger beers (ridgy didge alcoholic ginger beer not that ale shit you lot have) and they were easy as. Was a bit red cos they were brewed in silvertail country (brookvale is all wankers and middle class bogans but manly is ok for a quick dip) but they were beaut, good for gettin hammered and a bit of a veg with the sheilas and lads but yeah buggin in balmain was fun, stayed up to wee hours to avoid the nightriders though, those are barry crockers full of wogs and druggos looking for a blue or a midnight kebab after lockout.

True blue ocker sydney story.

Oh year, election this week. They are compulsory, but at least we have preference voting.

Straya.
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#65
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
hello I am also australian here to bring the funny australian words for all to enjoy
uh

tracky dacks
esky
bludge
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#66
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
We also call sunglasses "Sunnies" here. Also, yeah elections being compulsory. It's something I now gotta look forward to I guess.
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#67
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
shrappers/shrapnel, doona, swags, humpie

people have begun calling 'sloppy joes' 'hoodies' these days and it makes me sad

(jumper is also acceptable)

no more jokes with americans about wearing your favourite sloppy joe
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#68
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
I've never heard hoodies or jumpers being called sloppy joes... what state is that from
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#69
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
How ancient are you even CSJ? I've never heard of them being called sloppy joes either. I've known about American sloppy joes since forever though.
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#70
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
I thought sloppy joes were a food, like a ground beef mixed with spaghetti sauce on a burger bun?
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#71
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
when I was in primary school we once had a substitute teacher from america (or maybe canada? I don't remember exactly) who was confused by people using "heaps" to mean "a lot/lots" or "more than enough"

e.g. "there were heaps of people here yesterday"

or

"[pouring a drink for you] that enough?"
"yeah that's heaps, thanks"

I guess it's in the same vein as using "piles" or "loads" to mean the same thing
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#72
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
(06-29-2016, 10:34 AM)Bobert Wrote: »How ancient are you even CSJ?
twenty-*cough*
Jumpers at least in my memory, tended to refer more to fleecy warm things made of wool (ie; cardigans) and/or without a hood. If it had a hood, it was more likely to be called a 'sloppy joe'. Then hoodies came along.

Like how chips were chips until they became fries and biscuits became cookies.

Have heard older extended family using the term as well, but haven't seen anyone under the age of say, 18 outside my family call it that. Definitely old lingo.

E: Googling finds other people with similar recollections from Sydney and Melbourne as well as references in the Macquarie Dictionary, though generally older people afaics. That said, there are apparently places in Australia that still advertise 'sloppy joes' as clothing so there you go lol.

Ex2 Combo: Doing a facebook poll now. Had a few other people around here say they've head it used like that, though not everyone and mostly older folks.
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#73
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
You keep your american sloppy joes and I'll go ahead and eat one of our fam's go-tos for creative use of leftovers; bolognese sandwiches; mince in bolognese sauce from the previous day, covered in grated cheese (usually tasty cheddar), reheated and encapsulated in a 'squeezy sandwich' (what we'd call a sandwitch grilled in a sandwich press, no idea if this is slang anywhere at all but it's a great name and screw you lot, lol).
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#74
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
You mean a toastie?
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#75
RE: Australianisms & Regional Slang
enjoy your bolognese sloppy joe jaffles

sloppy joffle
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