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Critique and Advice; the treadmill of adventuring.
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vie
 RE: Critique and Advice; the treadmill of adventuring.
 

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So what's the etiquette for when your adventure suffers a suggestion drought? Anyone got any advice for or experience with that kind of thing?
06-16-2017, 10:10 PM
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NonAnalogue
 RE: Critique and Advice; the treadmill of adventuring.
Stay fresh!

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When that's happened to me, I wait a few days to be sure, then I just go with what the most likely action would be based on the last update.

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06-16-2017, 10:16 PM
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Tuesday
 RE: Critique and Advice; the treadmill of adventuring.
 

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I've only been here awhile, but I've asked kind folk on discord to throw me suggestions for a thread before. I've also seen people just... Carry on with the story and break at a more engaging decision point. Sometimes that's all it takes!
06-16-2017, 10:21 PM
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Dragon Fogel
 RE: Critique and Advice; the treadmill of adventuring.
The Goddamn Pacman

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I usually just ask; just not on the forum.

Taking a look at your adventure, the issue may be the question you ended the last update with. It's a weird question, and doesn't seem to have a lot of relevance to the situation - whatever we answer, the next update is probably going to involve waking up. So it's not clear how any answer is going to affect what happens next, which is the main point of suggestions.

In this case, it might be best to just do another update and try to end with a clearer prompt.
06-16-2017, 10:42 PM
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Zephyr Nepres
 RE: Critique and Advice; the treadmill of adventuring.
nerd lord supreme

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One thing I really like about Tuesday's Sixteenths is the way those question prompts are done. Instead of just asking "how do you react to what's being done/said" it asks questions which are more specific and add atmosphere. An example is a recent update where one of the other main character asks the current MC for his men to battle alongside them. Instead of just saying "how do you react" it asks "why is this a terrible idea?". For an adventure so focused on short but succinct updates it helps greatly because it guides the commenters while not completely railroading them, allowing for the author to maintain some control.

Does really cute mice people, vibrant characters/backgrounds and the most adorable art style you've ever seen interest you? Read Great Haven.

Have you ever wanted to save a bunch of kids from dying horribly in a nightmare dreamscape? Read Lucidstuck
06-16-2017, 10:58 PM
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bigro
 RE: Critique and Advice; the treadmill of adventuring.
Please explain

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(06-16-2017, 10:10 PM)vie Wrote: So what's the etiquette for when your adventure suffers a suggestion drought? Anyone got any advice for or experience with that kind of thing?

Depends on the tone of the adventure and the context, sometimes a lack of suggestions is suggestive in and of itself. Really often comes down to how suggestable* a specific situation is. If there's only really one thing a character can do, or if it's super obvious what is going to happen, there's no real need to suggest. I'm basically just rewording what fogel has said here anyway. A good way to avoid this I think is to ask yourself before you update, "could a suggestion change what is going to happen in a meaningful way." If not, just keep going with the story until it could. We all do it sometimes, don't fret too much, and as fogel said it's super easy to just ask folks to suggest. No harm in it.


*I'm trademarking this term.

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06-17-2017, 12:12 PM
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vie
 RE: Critique and Advice; the treadmill of adventuring.
 

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Thanks a bunch for all the feedback. Just continuing the story on your own was what I figured the move would be, just wanted to make sure I wouldn't be committing some sort of social faux pas.

In retrospect I can really see how the prompt was poorly worded. My original thought process, iirc, for ending the update there was that I wanted to telegraph that I was planning on ending the scene so that readers would have a chance to ask/do anything that they wanted to at the last second before the dream actually ended. Also I figured that if the amnesiac was going to wake up anyway, it would be more fun to spend an update or three on a weird dream logic way to wake up than just writing 'and then you wake up'. Obviously that didn't end up playing out.

So I guess the problem is that I didn't realize it would come across as a situation where player input didn't matter. I should have been more explicit about my intent re: giving a last chance to do dream stuff. Like I said, looking back I can totally see how someone would come to Fogel's conclusion about lack of agency. And in the end no matter what the guy was waking up eventually. But on the other hand, the suggestion I did get made the waking up process- and what came after- take a totally different turn from what I set out expecting to write, so I can't say that the readers didn't actually have power.

Actually though, this discussion works a perfect springboard into a tangentially related topic I was wondering about! How do you reconcile character consistency with reader agency? For example, in my adventure, two characters are attempting to enter a city. There are lots of valid ways to try and do that, and other things to explore in the meantime, but ultimately- assuming that they don't fail completely which admittedly could happen- no matter what path they take the end result will be about the same. They'll be in the city. This is just by virtue of the fact that characters have goals and are unlikely to act in ways that would go against them.

Additionally, there's the matter of the fact that different in-universe personalities would react differently to suggestions, or even refuse some outright. That also limits how much effect the readers can have on a much more immediate basis.

So what are different ways of resolving this conflict? Personally I've kind of found that over time readers tend to give more 'in character' suggestions, so does that aspect of the issue just kind of resolve itself? What about the matter of long-term character goals- is it actually a problem at all or just a fact of certain styles of adventure?

I'd be interested in hearing other peoples' takes on the matter.
Edit: holy fucking shit this is a lot of text sorry
(This post was last modified: 06-21-2017, 02:22 PM by vie.)
06-21-2017, 02:22 PM
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wyatt
 RE: Critique and Advice; the treadmill of adventuring.
 

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forum tips: Keep your art quality to a medium so you can make consisent and fast updates but still keep your reader engaged with charming art
06-29-2017, 09:15 PM
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